Computer Forensics Expert

Forensics is the practice of collecting, analyzing and reporting digital data in a way that is legally permissible. It can be used in the detection and prevention of crime and in any controversy in which the evidence is stored digitally. This discipline follows a process similar to that of other forensic disciplines, and faces similar problems.

There are few areas of delinquency or litigation where forensics can not be applied. Security forces have been among the oldest and heaviest users of computer forensics and as a result have often been at the forefront of developments in the field.

Computer equipment may constitute a ‘crime scene’, for example, with piracy or denial of service attacks, or may conduct tests in the form of emails, Internet history, documents or other files relating to crimes such as murder , Kidnapping, fraud, drug trafficking, child pornography, etc.

What can be analyzed?
  • Computer equipment (servers and personal computers).
  • Email accounts and associated messages.
  • External Storage Devices: USB Flash Drives, SD Cards, CD, DVD
  • Mobile phones, smartphones, tablets, PDAs, …
  • Database systems.
  • Forums and social networks.
  • Websites missing in the face of an investigation threat.
  • Complex software systems (ERP, CRM, accounting solutions, etc.)

It is not just the content of emails, documents and other files that may be of interest to researchers, but also what the computer forensics expert Name of “ metadata “. These metadata are associated with such files. A forensic exam can reveal when a document first appeared on a computer, when it was last edited, when it was the last Save or print and who was the user who carried out these actions.

Most recently, commercial organizations have used forensic informatics to their benefit in a variety of cases, such as;

  • Theft of Intellectual Property
  • Industrial espionage
  • Disputes in a Work Environment
  • Fraud Investigations
  • Counterfeit
  • Bankruptcy Investigations
  • Using inappropriate e-mail and using the Internet in the workplace
  • Regulatory Compliance

Consult the section of services offered within the portfolio of computer expert and computer forensics.

Protocol

In order for a digital test to be admissible it must be reliable and non-detrimental, which means that at all stages of a forensic team, the admissibility of the research must be a priority in the work of the computer forensics.

The four fundamental principles for forensic analysis performed by a computer expert are

1. No action should change the data held by a computer or storage media that can then be challenged in court.
2. In cases where a person is forced to access the original data stored on a computer or storage media, that person must be competent to do so and be able to provide evidence to clarify the relevance and consequences Of their shares.
3. A reliable record of audits or other records carried out on all processes that apply to electronic evidence in a computer system must be maintained. An independent third party must be able to examine the processes and obtain the same result.
4. The person in charge of the investigation has a global responsibility to ensure that the law and these principles are fulfilled.

Computer Forensics Phases

This stage usually involves the elaboration of a structured report in which the initial questions are answered, together with the findings found a posteriori by the examiner. It would also cover any other information that the examiner deems relevant for the investigation.

The report should be written with the final reader in mind; In many cases the reader does not have a technical profile, so terminology must be suitable for the reader . This last should not be confused as a justification for not knowing and using technical language , since the report must also satisfy the technical requirements sufficient for the conclusions to be evidential.

This stage usually involves the elaboration of a structured report in which the initial questions are answered, together with the findings found a posteriori by the examiner. It would also cover any other information that the examiner deems relevant for the investigation.

The report should be written with the final reader in mind; In many cases the reader does not have a technical profile, so terminology must be suitable for the reader . This last should not be confused as a justification for not knowing and using technical language , since the report must also satisfy the technical requirements sufficient for the conclusions to be evidential.

The assessment stage includes the receipt of instructions, the clarification of those instructions and the assignment of functions and resources. The risk analysis for the application of the regulations may include an assessment of the probability of physical threat upon entering the property of a Suspicious and the best way to counter it. Business organizations, management, and individual clients also need to be aware of health and safety issues, conflicts of interest and potential financial risks – and their reputation – in accepting a particular project.

The evaluation must be a meticulous process in which the computer expert must know as accurately as possible the background and object of the expert analysis or audit to be performed

If the acquisition will take place on-site and not in a forensic computer lab, then this stage would include identifying devices that can store the evidence and securing the scene of collection of such evidence. Interviews or meetings with staff who (End-users of the equipment, the director, the person responsible for the provision of computer services, etc.) are usually carried out at this stage.

The collection stage also includes the labeling and bagging of evidence on the site, to be sealed in tamper-proof bags or envelopes. In CEDESA, we have protection material for disks, cards and USB devices, shockproof, water, etc. In order to guarantee the transport of the material used to our forensic laboratory.

The analysis depends on the specific characteristics of each job. The computer expert usually provides information to the client during the analysis and from this dialog the analysis can take a different path or be reduced to specific areas. The analysis must be accurate, complete, impartial, recorded and repeatable.

There are multiple tools available for forensic analysis. It is our opinion, the computer forensics expert . The main requirements of a computer forensics tool is that it does what it is supposed to do and the only way for examiners to make sure this is to regularly test and calibrate the tools that are based on the analysis takes to Cable before. It is known in the sector the existence of pseudo-professionals whose work is based only on the execution of an automatic tool that provides standard reports without knowing the basis of the results obtained. Objectively, this type of evidence always brings harmful results to the applicants since in the questioning of the hearing if a judicial proceeding is opened, the expert must be able to face all the questions that are asked, justifying the Results.

To verify the correct operation of a tool, the dual-use process is used (if the ‘A’ tool of the examiner finds an artifact ‘X’ in the ‘Y’ position, then the tool ‘B’ must replicate these results).

As in the preparation stage, the review stage is often overlooked. This may be due to the perceived costs of doing a non-billable job, or the need to “move on.” However, incorporating the review into each computer expert can help save money and, above all, increase the quality of the report submitted by the computer expert.

A review of an analysis can be simple, quick and can begin during any of the above steps. Any lessons learned at this stage should be applied to the next examination and introduced into the preparation stage.

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